The Raspberry Pi 3 Minecraft Server Recipe

So since I went through my last heavy blogging phase, my son grew up quite a bit and ended up getting into Minecraft. Being a sucker for games that allow you to build, I got into it too, and decided after not too long that it would be fun to play with him on a server. I also knew a teensy bit about the Raspberry Pi, and found out through some drifting about the interwebs that people had successfully set up very low-cost servers using the Pi. And thus the future opened up to me like a glorious sunrise over a new and wondrous world.

In an effort to ensure that I am able to repeat the process of building a server (which, not by coincidence, I happen to be doing right now), I’ve decided to put these instructions on the blog to make it easier for me to remember everything that needs to be done, and also to help out those lonely searchers who come this way, looking for what I had sought. Hence…

Marc’s Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server Instructions

  1. Start with a fresh install of NOOBS
  2. sudo apt-get update
  3. sudo apt-get upgrade
  4. Install latest version of Java SE Development: Look for Linux ARM32 v6/v7 Hard Float ABI; download via RPi browser to Downloads directory.
  5. Once downloaded, go to Downloads folder: cd ~/Downloads; then sudo cp [java filename].tar.gz /opt/ to move the file to the /opt/ directory, where java will be installed.
  6. Extract Java into the /opt/ directory: sudo tar xvzf [java filename].tar.gz (x tells tar to extract the files; v lists all the files as they are extracted – “verbose”; z tells tar to uncompress the file; f tells tar that you will give it a filename to work with)
  7. Check to make sure Java extracted correctly: sudo /opt/[java directory name]/bin/java -version
  8. Create a minecraft directory: sudo mkdir /home/minecraft
  9. Go to minecraft directory: cd /home/minecraft
  10. Obtain the builder tool from Spigot that will be used to build the server: sudo wget https://hub.spigotmc.org/jenkins/job/BuildTools/lastSuccessfulBuild/artifact/target/BuildTools.jar
  11. Run the builder tool (will take between 15-30 minutes):
    For Raspberry Pi 2: sudo java -jar BuildTools.jar
    For Raspberry Pi B+/B: sudo wget http://www.mediafire.com/download/nld0qtn49gyx723/spigot-1.9.2.jar
    Or, if all else fails, this might be a good place to find spigot: http://tcpr.ca/downloads/spigot
  12. When the download and install finishes, check to make sure it was successful by entering command ls and looking for spigot.jar
  13. Make sure you remain in the /home/minecraft directory to create the server files within that directory. This is accomplished by the entering of one of the following commands:
    Raspberry Pi B+/B: sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0_65/bin/java -Xms256M -Xmx496M -jar spigot-1.8.8.jar nogui
    Raspberry Pi 2: sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0_65/bin/java -Xms512M -Xmx1008M -jar spigot-1.8.8.jar
    Note: I ran into an Error: cannot access jarfile message when attempting to run the commands in step 12; to get around this, I launched from the /minecraft/ directory and removed the directory path to the spigot-1.8.8.jar file from the command.
  14. The server will stop because the eula.txt file needs to be modified.
  15. Type sudo nano eula.txt; change “false” in the eula text to “TRUE”, then [ctrl] x, y, and [enter] to save the change.
  16. Restart the server with the appropriate command from step 12 above.
  17. Spigot will now build the Minecraft world.
  18. When Spigot finishes building the world, type stop to quit the server.
  19. Now add plugins in the plugins folder: cd plugins

Long Time Gone

So it’s been 2 years, 4 months and 17 days since I last posted on this blog. Let’s just round that up to two and a half years. Feels like a long time ago, although in the grand scheme of things it really isn’t.

Obamacare still exists, unfortunately. It’s performing about as well as had been predicted, but the inertia of government seems to have set in and who knows when we’ll be able to get out of that mess. Religious liberty is on the ropes, with the triumph of the marriage-redefinition crowd in the Supreme Court. The 2016 presidential race seems to be coming down to a contest between a Democrat nominee who is most qualified to be in prison and a Republican nominee who may qualify for a diagnosis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

So that’s that.

Perhaps I’ll blog again, just for fun. Perhaps not. But it’s been sort of fun to log in and kick the tires.

Obamacare: The Greatest Show On Earth

remaincalm
Artist’s rendering of Wednesday’s meeting

Roll Call posted a fascinating article on Wednesday detailing the growing sense of concern (or perhaps it would be more accurate to call it PANIC!) that many Congressional Democrats—especially those in marginally safe to contested seats—are experiencing over the rolling catastrophe of Obamacare’s implementation. For those who opposed the passage of the law in the first place, it’s a somewhat satisfying scene, which Jonah Goldberg is correct to refer to as a sort of “Schadenfreudarama.” Now, granted: it’s not a completely satisfying sort of schadenfreude; it would be much more satisfying if the consequences of the massive failure only affected those who insisted on pushing the thing through in the first place, and didn’t involve millions of people losing health insurance plans that they liked, with millions more likely on the way—along with the hardships that fact will entail for so many people. But in these days of chaos and confusion, I suppose I’ll take comfort in what little scraps of enjoyment come from watching those who supported this massive act of legislative malpractice scramble to save themselves from the consequences of their actions (which, of course, they had repeatedly been warned about).

But back to that article, which provides details on a meeting that occurred Wednesday between House Democrats and White House officials in which members of Congress basically demanded that the Obama Administration FIX THIS MESS. Some of the quotes in the article seem to me quite revealing of the mentality that prevails on the left side of the aisle in Congress*. For instance:

“Why can’t we call people who know how to do these things, who do it for corporate America, and say, ‘We have a website, fix it?’” asked Rep. José E. Serrano, D-N.Y. “Maybe I’m being simplistic, but can’t we call Bill Gates up and say, ‘Take care of this?’ Or go to a college dorm and say, ‘You guys, you invented Yahoo, can you take care of this?’”

Continue reading “Obamacare: The Greatest Show On Earth”

Ethics and Economics

Kevin Williamson at NRO points out the connection between the economic and moral imperatives to get the public sector under control:

The city fathers of Detroit inherited one of the richest and most productive cities in the world, and they ruined it in a generation. The gentlemen in Washington have been entrusted with the richest and most productive nation in the history of the world, and the trendline does not look good. Those of us seeking to radically reduce the footprint of government must remind ourselves from time to time that our case is as much ethical as economic, that the ethical and the economic are indeed closely intertwined.

Wisconsin: In Play

Awesome:

It has been emblazoned on mainstream media that the exit poll also showed Barack Obama leading Mitt Romney in the state 51%-45%. But if you think the exit poll was 4% too Democratic—and that’s in line with exit poll discrepancies with actual vote results over the last decade, as documented by the exit poll pioneer, the late Warren Mitofsky*—that result looks more like 49%-47% Romney. Or assume the remaining Milwaukee County precincts whittle Republican Governor Scott Walker’s margin over Democratic Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett to 53%-47%, which looks likely, the Obama-Romney numbers would look like 48%-48%.

Also Awesome:

The Walker reforms hurt AFSCME in Wisconsin almost as badly as Ronald Reagan hurt PATCO, the air traffic controller union he famously crushed in 1981. Public sector workers have deserted their unions in droves since the state clipped union bargaining rights and stopped automatic collection of dues. After a string of bitter, humiliating and expensvie defeats, labor in Wisconsin will now be a shadow of its former self, lacking the troops, the money and the morale.

In Praise of Scott Walker

It’s been a while since I took to the blog to praise an awesome governor; Chris Christie got this treatment a while back, I know. Heck, it’s been a while since I noted how awesome Paul Ryan is. I’m way behind.

Governor Scott Walker
King of Awesome

That being said, Scott Walker is awesome and Wisconsin is lucky to have him in the Governorship. If only every state had a governor with half the courage of Walker to take on the fiscal problems they face, this country would be in much better shape. May God bless our nation with a wave of Chris Christies and Scott Walkers.

Walker is, of course, the subject of a recall election in Wisconsin these days, which would be hilarious if it weren’t such a waste of time and resources. Allegedly the recall is happening because Walker’s policies – specifically his collective bargaining reforms – are so damaging to the state. The reality is that public sector unions are pissed off at Walker for making it harder for them to collect their dues, among other things. Why would I say such a thing? Because a mere 6 days before the election, Walker’s opponent still can’t name one Wisconsin school district that has been harmed by Walker’s reforms. “We can do an analysis and get back to you on that” is the best he can do.

Politics is ridiculous in 2012. Please, Wisconsin – don’t make it stupider. Keep Governor Walker right where he is.

More From Coolidge

I make no apologies for shamelessly quoting Calvin Coolidge these days. Calvin Coolidge is awesome. Here he is addressing the National Education Association on July 4, 1924:

By this I do not mean that there is in contemplation, or required, any change in our fundamental institutions. I mean, rather, that we are beginning to reap the rewards which accrue from the existence of those institutions and our devotion and loyalty to them. Some principles are so constant and so obvious that we do not need to change them, but we need rather to observe them. The world is fairly well agreed on the probable permanence of the first four tables of the arithmetic with which I struggled when I attended the district school. It is not thought that they need to be changed, or that we can make any progress by refusing to apply them. Those who seek to evade them in the ordinary business and procedure of life would undoubtedly find that such action would work either to the ruin of any commercial enterprise, or if it did not, the beneficiaries of such a disregard of the commonly accepted rules of addition would undoubtedly find that a very large majority of people would be old fashioned enough to charge them with fraud. The institutions of the Government and society may not always be susceptible of a demonstration which is as exact as those of mathematics, but nevertheless political relationship is a very old science which has been set out in theory and wrought out in practice through very many centuries. Its fundamental principles are fairly well established. That there could have seen gathered together a body of men so learned in that science, so experienced in its application, so talented and so wise in its statement and demonstration, as those who prepared, formulated, and secured the adoption of the American Constitution, will never cease to be the wonder and admiration of the profoundest students of Government. After making every allowance for a fortunate combination of circumstances and the ac complishments of human ingenuity, they have been nearly all forced to come to the belief that it can be accounted for only by the addition of another element, which we must recognize as the guiding hand of Providence. As we can make progress in science not by the disregard, but by the application of the laws of mathematics, so in my firm conviction we can make progress politically and socially, not by a disregard of those fundamental principles which are the recognized, ratified and established American institutions, but by their scrupulous support and observance. American ideals do not require to be changed so much as they require to be understood and applied.

More:

President Calvin Coolidge
President Calvin Coolidge

It was only as this work was accomplished, as these instruments were provided, these properties built, and these possessions accumulated, that there could be a reduction in the hours of labor, an increase in the rewards of employment, and a general betterment in those material conditions which result in a higher standard of living. The leisure for culture had to be secured in this way. Servitude of all kinds is scarcely ever abolished unless there is created economic opportunity for freedom. We are beginning to see that the economic development of our country was not only necessary for advancing the welfare of the people, but that we must maintain an expanding power of production if that welfare is to be increased. Business makes a most valuable contribution to human progress.

As we look back upon all this development, while we know that it was absolutely dependent upon a reign of law, nevertheless some of us can not help thinking how little of it has been dependent on acts of legislation. Given their institutions, the people themselves have in the past, as they must in the future, to a very large degree worked out their own salvation without the interposition of the Government. It is always possible to regulate and supervise by legislation what has already been created, but while legislation can stimulate and encourage, the real creative ability which builds up and develops the country, and in general makes human existence more tolerable and life more complete, has to be supplied by the genius of the people themselves. The Government can supply no substitute for enterprise.

Oh man that’s good presidentin’.

EVEN MORE:

For the most part our institutions are attacked in the name of social and economic reform. Unless there be some teaching of sound economics in the schools, the voter and taxpayer are in danger of accepting vague theories which lead only to social discontent and public disaster. The body politic has little chance of choosing patriotic of ficials who can administer its financial affairs with wisdom and safety, unless there is a general diffusion of knowledge and information on elementary economic subjects sufficient to create and adequately to support public opinion. Every one ought to realize that the sole source of national wealth is thrift and industry, and that the sole supply of the public treasury is the toil of the people.

Coolidge would be horrified to see what has become of his beloved nation today. Does anyone understand that the sole source of the wealth of the country is “thrift and industry” anymore? Does anyone connect that all that massive spending that happens in Washington D.C. rests on the backs of the people? Do young people graduate from high school (or even college) with a basic grasp of economics? If so, why is personal indebtedness so high? Why do we consistently vote for politicians who see no problem with massive deficits and debt?