In Praise of Scott Walker

It’s been a while since I took to the blog to praise an awesome governor; Chris Christie got this treatment a while back, I know. Heck, it’s been a while since I noted how awesome Paul Ryan is. I’m way behind.

Governor Scott Walker
King of Awesome

That being said, Scott Walker is awesome and Wisconsin is lucky to have him in the Governorship. If only every state had a governor with half the courage of Walker to take on the fiscal problems they face, this country would be in much better shape. May God bless our nation with a wave of Chris Christies and Scott Walkers.

Walker is, of course, the subject of a recall election in Wisconsin these days, which would be hilarious if it weren’t such a waste of time and resources. Allegedly the recall is happening because Walker’s policies – specifically his collective bargaining reforms – are so damaging to the state. The reality is that public sector unions are pissed off at Walker for making it harder for them to collect their dues, among other things. Why would I say such a thing? Because a mere 6 days before the election, Walker’s opponent still can’t name one Wisconsin school district that has been harmed by Walker’s reforms. “We can do an analysis and get back to you on that” is the best he can do.

Politics is ridiculous in 2012. Please, Wisconsin – don’t make it stupider. Keep Governor Walker right where he is.

More From Coolidge

I make no apologies for shamelessly quoting Calvin Coolidge these days. Calvin Coolidge is awesome. Here he is addressing the National Education Association on July 4, 1924:

By this I do not mean that there is in contemplation, or required, any change in our fundamental institutions. I mean, rather, that we are beginning to reap the rewards which accrue from the existence of those institutions and our devotion and loyalty to them. Some principles are so constant and so obvious that we do not need to change them, but we need rather to observe them. The world is fairly well agreed on the probable permanence of the first four tables of the arithmetic with which I struggled when I attended the district school. It is not thought that they need to be changed, or that we can make any progress by refusing to apply them. Those who seek to evade them in the ordinary business and procedure of life would undoubtedly find that such action would work either to the ruin of any commercial enterprise, or if it did not, the beneficiaries of such a disregard of the commonly accepted rules of addition would undoubtedly find that a very large majority of people would be old fashioned enough to charge them with fraud. The institutions of the Government and society may not always be susceptible of a demonstration which is as exact as those of mathematics, but nevertheless political relationship is a very old science which has been set out in theory and wrought out in practice through very many centuries. Its fundamental principles are fairly well established. That there could have seen gathered together a body of men so learned in that science, so experienced in its application, so talented and so wise in its statement and demonstration, as those who prepared, formulated, and secured the adoption of the American Constitution, will never cease to be the wonder and admiration of the profoundest students of Government. After making every allowance for a fortunate combination of circumstances and the ac complishments of human ingenuity, they have been nearly all forced to come to the belief that it can be accounted for only by the addition of another element, which we must recognize as the guiding hand of Providence. As we can make progress in science not by the disregard, but by the application of the laws of mathematics, so in my firm conviction we can make progress politically and socially, not by a disregard of those fundamental principles which are the recognized, ratified and established American institutions, but by their scrupulous support and observance. American ideals do not require to be changed so much as they require to be understood and applied.

More:

President Calvin Coolidge
President Calvin Coolidge

It was only as this work was accomplished, as these instruments were provided, these properties built, and these possessions accumulated, that there could be a reduction in the hours of labor, an increase in the rewards of employment, and a general betterment in those material conditions which result in a higher standard of living. The leisure for culture had to be secured in this way. Servitude of all kinds is scarcely ever abolished unless there is created economic opportunity for freedom. We are beginning to see that the economic development of our country was not only necessary for advancing the welfare of the people, but that we must maintain an expanding power of production if that welfare is to be increased. Business makes a most valuable contribution to human progress.

As we look back upon all this development, while we know that it was absolutely dependent upon a reign of law, nevertheless some of us can not help thinking how little of it has been dependent on acts of legislation. Given their institutions, the people themselves have in the past, as they must in the future, to a very large degree worked out their own salvation without the interposition of the Government. It is always possible to regulate and supervise by legislation what has already been created, but while legislation can stimulate and encourage, the real creative ability which builds up and develops the country, and in general makes human existence more tolerable and life more complete, has to be supplied by the genius of the people themselves. The Government can supply no substitute for enterprise.

Oh man that’s good presidentin’.

EVEN MORE:

For the most part our institutions are attacked in the name of social and economic reform. Unless there be some teaching of sound economics in the schools, the voter and taxpayer are in danger of accepting vague theories which lead only to social discontent and public disaster. The body politic has little chance of choosing patriotic of ficials who can administer its financial affairs with wisdom and safety, unless there is a general diffusion of knowledge and information on elementary economic subjects sufficient to create and adequately to support public opinion. Every one ought to realize that the sole source of national wealth is thrift and industry, and that the sole supply of the public treasury is the toil of the people.

Coolidge would be horrified to see what has become of his beloved nation today. Does anyone understand that the sole source of the wealth of the country is “thrift and industry” anymore? Does anyone connect that all that massive spending that happens in Washington D.C. rests on the backs of the people? Do young people graduate from high school (or even college) with a basic grasp of economics? If so, why is personal indebtedness so high? Why do we consistently vote for politicians who see no problem with massive deficits and debt?

Reactionaries

President Calvin Coolidge

Calvin Coolidge:

It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may therefore very well discard their conclusions for something more modern. But that reasoning can not be applied to this great charter. If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final. No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions. If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people. Those who wish to proceed in that direction can not lay claim to progress. They are reactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers.

More:

Under a system of popular government there will always be those who will seek for political preferment by clamoring for reform. While there is very little of this which is not sincere, there is a large portion that is not well informed. In my opinion very little of just criticism can attach to the theories and principles of our institutions. There is far more danger of harm than there is hope of good in any radical changes. We do need a better understanding and comprehension of them and a better knowledge of the foundations of government in general. Our forefathers came to certain conclusions and decided upon certain courses of action which have been a great blessing to the world. Before we can understand their conclusions we must go back and review the course which they followed. We must think the thoughts which they thought. Their intellectual life centered around the meeting-house. They were intent upon religious worship. While there were always among them men of deep learning, and later those who had comparatively large possessions, the mind of the people was not so much engrossed in how much they knew, or how much they had, as in how they were going to live. While scantily provided with other literature, there was a wide acquaintance with the Scriptures. Over a period as great as that which measures the existence of our independence they were subject to this discipline not only in their religious life and educational training, but also in their political thought. They were a people who came under the influence of a great spiritual development and acquired a great moral power.

No other theory is adequate to explain or comprehend the Declaration of Independence. It is the product of the spiritual insight of the people. We live in an age of science and of abounding accumulation of material things. These did not create our Declaration. Our Declaration created them. The things of the spirit come first. Unless we cling to that, all our material prosperity, overwhelming though it may appear, will turn to a barren sceptre in our grasp. If we are to maintain the great heritage which has been bequeathed to us, we must be like-minded as the fathers who created it. We must not sink into a pagan materialism. We must cultivate the reverence which they had for the things that are holy. We must follow the spiritual and moral leadership which they showed. We must keep replenished, that they may glow with a more compelling flame, the altar fires before which they worshiped.

There was a time when American political leaders knew how to speak and did so fearlessly. Oh, for a rebirth of these traits…

The Socialist

Chris Christie is the Greatest Politician Ever, Maybe.

A W E S O M E:

“They informed me my budget was dead on arrival,” Christie told the crowd. “They said, ‘We’ll shut the government down.'”

“I said, ‘Listen, I’m going to get into a black Suburban and I’m going to drive back to the governor’s residence, go upstairs and order a pizza. I’m going to turn on a baseball game. You all can call me when you decide to reopen the government.'”

Governor Chris Christie
HE IS THE ONE

Barney Frank Forced To Admit The Blindingly Obvious

Larry Kudlow got this out of Barney Frank:

“I hope by next year we’ll have abolished Fannie and Freddie,” he said. Remarkable. And he went on to say that “it was a great mistake to push lower-income people into housing they couldn’t afford and couldn’t really handle once they had it.” He then added, “I had been too sanguine about Fannie and Freddie.”

If only we could get more leftists to realize that the policies they push in order to “help” the poor and underprivileged more often than not end up hurting everyone – especially the poor and underprivileged that the left claims to care about so much.  In the meantime, let’s enjoy this moment of sunshine from one of the worst members of Congress who will no doubt try to walk this back at some point when it’s politically convenient.

Via Contentions.